#BlogExodus Narrow Places of Mitzrayim

My friend and colleague, Rabbi Phyllis Sommer, also known as Ima on the Bima, presented a great idea for anyone blogging, tweeting, facebooking, or instagramming (don’t know if that is really a word, but it’s a great app – thanks DovLev). This year, in preparation for Passover, we should Blog the Exodus. While I don’t blog daily, I’m hoping that maybe, this might inspire me to do more, or at least post something on Facebook and Twitter. So follow me there as well as we prepare for Pesach, celebrating our Freedom and life.  You can search, #BlogExodus or #exodusgram for more inspiration.

Mitzrayim, so easily thought of as that place thousands of years ago. It was there that Joseph was sent down into slavery; there that Jacob and his family joined Joseph to survive the famine; there that the Israelites were enslaved for over 400 years. It was in Mitzrayim where God heard the Israelites cry out in pain and suffering looking to be released. Mitzrayim was the narrow place, the tunnel in which there seems to be no easy exit and the walls continually creep in closer and closer as one passes through.

There are these caves in our own lives. The walls seem to be closing in around us at times and we can’t run fast enough toward the light to get out. The narrow places do not allow us to move so easily and eventually, turning around to go back is impossible. There is only one way to go, and that is forward.

How do we allow our feet to move us forward? How do we allow ourselves to not just crouch down and wait for something, anything, anyone?

Somehow, we do. Somehow our feet propel us forward and our ears listen for comforting sounds of others or that which will soothe our soul. We sing a song, we think in our heads, but really, its tune echoes on the walls. We are comforted by our own voice, our own thoughts, our own strength.

Mitzrayim is the perception that we feel we are stuck, we feel we cannot move, we feel we are enslaved. But if only we allow ourselves to stand, take one step at a time and have faith that we can move forward, we might see that the cave is not so narrow. We might see that we are not alone in this space. We feel the presence of others with us, singing our niggun and walking hand in hand. There is a light ahead in this narrow space, we only have to find our way toward it and remember, we are never alone.

One thought on “#BlogExodus Narrow Places of Mitzrayim”

  1. “How do we allow our feet to move us forward? How do we allow ourselves to not just crouch down and wait for something, anything, anyone? Somehow, we do.” t
    That’s the question I keep asking. I’m not sure my answer is the same as this. I’m still in Mitzrayim.

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